Credit Card Tips And Tricks: How To Save Money

Credit Card Tips and Tricks: How to Save Money

by Marjorie Hajim — 2 weeks ago in Finance 5 min. read
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With so many perks and incentives available, it’s understandable why individuals would be sucked into spending and using their cards for purposes other than what they were meant for. This may be harmful to both your finances and the business as a whole. In a society where people are clamoring for freebies, giving away profits frequently results in worse company practices. The suggestions in the following article will help you save money and keep your credit card balance within acceptable limits.

What is A Credit Card?

Using a credit card is a means to obtain “credit” or a loan from a bank. The revolving line of credit is the official term. It’s a credit card with a predefined borrowing limit that you may access at any time. The credit limit is determined at the time of application. If your credit card is approved, you can use it to make purchases online or in person without having to pay with cash.

Your balance increases each time you use a credit card to make a purchase. The money above your minimum payment, if you don’t pay off your debt in full each month, goes towards interest and fees. This might make it challenging to pay the whole sum each month and difficult to buy products on time.

You might wish to apply for a personal loan instead if you believe that using a credit card is not for you but you want additional dollars for an emergency. You have a variety of online loan options to choose from, some of which have interest rates that are significantly lower than those on credit cards.

How do Credit Cards Work?

Interest Rates

The appropriate interest rate will be disclosed to you when you apply for a credit card. You must pay this annual fee on any unpaid balance that is not settled by the due date, regardless of how much it is. You’ll pay a different amount in interest each month. The amount you spend, the amount you repay, and the timing of the repayment all affect it. For instance, if the interest rate is 18% per year and your amount is $100, you will be charged 18% per year of $100, or around $1.50 per month.

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Credit Limit

You can only borrow up to your credit limit. When you apply for a credit card, you have the option of setting your credit limit or allowing the bank to do so based on the details you provided on your financial situation. The minimum card limit that the bank will set will vary depending on the kind of card you apply for.

Interest-Free Periods

The majority of credit cards provide “up-to-44 days” or “up-to-55 days” of interest-free repayment on purchases. This implies that interest on amounts you owe doesn’t start to accumulate until the statement due date.

Rather than on the day you make a transaction, interest-free periods often begin on the first day of your payment cycle. For instance, if your credit card has a 44-day interest-free grace period, you have 44 days from the day of your statement to make full payment of the closing balance. Similarly, if your account shows an interest-free days payment, you must make this complete payment. You will then be assessed interest.

Repayments

Like any loan, you must repay a credit card bill once you have it. Every month, your bank will give you statements that include the total amount you have loaned, any repayments you have made, the interest rate, any accumulated interest or fees, and the minimum payment due.

Make sure you pay the closing sum in full by the deadline each month to avoid paying interest. You must pay at least the minimum payment amount indicated on your statement if you don’t pay the closing debt in full. You can be charged late fees or missed payment costs if this sum isn’t paid by the deadline.

Fees

There are several fees connected with credit cards, such as yearly fees, monthly fees, cash advance fees, late payment fees, and foreign transaction fees. Make sure you are aware of any potential costs before applying for any card and that you have prepared for any fees you could pay.

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Balance Transfer and Cash Advances

You can transfer a balance from an existing card—say, one from another credit card issuer or a shop card—to a new credit card through a balance transfer. An introductory term with a reduced initial interest rate is frequently provided with new cards, which can help you save money on interest. The outstanding balance (together with any associated interest) will be considered as a cash advance after the promotional rate expires and will be subject to interest at the cash advance interest rates.

You may also withdraw cash using various credit cards. This is referred to as a cash advance. Keep in mind that there will be interest charges and higher interest rates applied to the amount you withdraw with cash advances.



Credit Card Tips & Tricks That Could Help Your Credit Health

  1. Pay off your credit card balance every month. Pay off your credit card debt in full at the end of each billing cycle to avoid paying interest on purchases made with it. If you can resist the need to spend more than you can afford to in any given month, you may profit from using a credit card without being charged interest.
  2. Use your credit card for needs, not wants. It’s important to use credit cards responsibly. Spending money carelessly might result in debt. In an emergency, such as when a cell phone bill is due before your next paycheck, credit cards can be utilized. Use the credit card as a short-term loan to yourself, and then pay it off as quickly as you can to reduce or completely prevent interest rates.
  3. Never miss a payment. Even if the minimum payment is all you can afford, pay your bills each month. Missing a credit card payment might hurt your credit report, pay a late charge, and pay penalty interest rates.
  4. Use your credit card as a budgeting tool. Try using a credit card as a budgeting tool if you’re convinced you can use one responsibly and pay the debt in full each month. You can easily calculate your monthly spending by using your credit card for all of your purchases. Naturally, you should only do this if you are certain of your ability to settle the sum each month. Never charge more on your card than you have in your bank account to prevent your credit card spending from getting out of control.
  5. Use a rewards credit card. It makes sense to use a credit card that lets you earn rewards if you use it for the majority or all of your expenditures. You may save money on interest payments as well as gain incentives like money, airline miles, or shopping points.
  6. Reduce your credit card limit. Sometimes, our credit card limitations are far more than we need. Have you ever used up all of your allotment? If not, think about lowering them. Because banks will base your payments on the card’s limit rather than the balance, it will reduce the number of issues you may get yourself into and increase your borrowing ability. Additionally, regularly check your credit to determine how much remaining credit you have.
  7. Don’t carry your card around with you. Use your credit card only for purchases you are positive you will make and avoid keeping it in your wallet or handbag. This removes the temptation to use it each time you wrongly assume you need it but don’t. You should take precautions since your credit cards might be misplaced or stolen.
  8. Use a written budget. You shouldn’t use credit cards to pay for items you want but haven’t budgeted for. Use the credit card as a tool inside that budget to help you stay within it after creating a detailed, written budget that outlines how much you should spend in each category.




The Bottom Line

The decision to use a credit card ultimately comes down to personal preference. Choose the approach that will fit your lifestyle the best and provide you with the greatest assurance that you are still maintaining your financial obligation. The basic rule of thumb is that you should always pay your balance in full by the due date. Credit cards can be a convenient tool for spending and paying, but you’ll save yourself a world of trouble down the road if you avoid using them as the only method of spending and paying. And if you like your credit card perks, don’t worry—you don’t have to give them up. Just tone things down a bit, and you’ll have it made.

Marjorie Hajim

Marjorie Hajim is the SEO Manager for Friendly Finance. Friendly Finance is a leading loan matching service in Australia specialising in consumer finance. She loves growing businesses with a focus on their online presence and is passionate about organic growth and all things digital. She has written articles for FinanceBuzz, Futuramo, FinancedBlog, & many more!

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